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For the love of books

For the love of books published on No Comments on For the love of books

I have always had a great fondness for things that looked like books but weren’t books. In fact, I have a fondness for things that look like things they are not overall. I am remembering beautiful porcelain bowls that looked like lettuce leaves and porcelain cups that looked like solo cups…that’s another post. This one is all about the books. Amazingly, I only have one of these.

Pictured:

Librarian comic round up

Librarian comic round up published on No Comments on Librarian comic round up

Hey, so I’ve noticed that comic postings can sometimes get buried and not be obvious. I’m working on a new way to run my comics on my site, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy these slices of library life:

anotherleak
Cartoon from “From the Editor: The State of Our Libraries” an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve on 6 June 2013, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1540-3572&volume=23&issue=4-5&spage=175
illersatconference
Cartoon from “From the Editor: Introducing Reports From the Field” an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve on 29 Sep 2014, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1540-3572&volume=24&issue=1-2&spage=1
subscription libraries
Cartoon from “From the Editor: E-books Building the New Subscription Library” an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve on 10 May 2013, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1540-3572&volume=23&issue=1&spage=1

 

librarygrads

 

 

a little obsession with author voices

a little obsession with author voices published on No Comments on a little obsession with author voices

Before copyright law there were poets and playwrights who bemoaned the theft of their work and words by others while at the same time they stole words to build their poems and plays.  Plagiarism was rampant, though, the act of literary theft was only just termed plagiarism, by one poet’s re-purposing of a Latin term for man-stealing or kidnapping.  After copyright law was established, there were authors postulating its merits and its deficiencies, in writing, to the public and their peers.  Authors were thinking about copyright.

When I discovered that one of my favorite authors, Mark Twain, had stood before congress to give his professional opinion on a copyright term extension I was more than excited.  But, I found myself arguing with Twain.  I could see some of his point, but I did not agree with all of it.  I wondered, where were the author voices on copyright today.  I’m still searching, but what I’m finding is that most of the well known, professionally published and successful authors are letting publishers and author’s guilds speak for them.  Do they really agree with everything that’s being said?

Now that copyright is immediate without registration, the world is teaming with authors.  Some write for fun, and to entertain their friends.  Some make a living off of it, or perhaps off of other creative endeavors offered up to the public via the web.  And just like those poet thieves from before copyright law, all authors are users of copyrighted content as well.  With this huge population of authors, there is still little thinking and postulating and writing about copyright.  I’m not saying copyright theory is crazy sexy or anything…well, no, you know what?  It is.  It is obsession worthy.  It is discussion worthy.  I mean, think about it, copyright law is government regulation over what we birth and grow in our minds and give to the world.  If Athena emerged from Zeus’ head today she would be protected by copyright law!  If art is a conversation, copyright law is keeping checks on what we say!

copyrightfistfight CopyrightposterTwain&Tolstoy
Anyway, my obsession with finding author voices has resulted in these things, so far.  Twain and Tolstoy were contemporaries; and if you think all authors would argue for longer and stronger copyright law, Tolstoy would prove you wrong.  He was against copyright.  He looked on his writing as a service to the public that both provided him the experiences he used to write and the living that let him write.  The burden of his education and leisure was to reach out to people, teach them, and attempt to enrich their lives with the fruit of his literary genius.

LeEtta’s copyright poster! | Iconosquare

LeEtta’s copyright poster! | Iconosquare published on No Comments on LeEtta’s copyright poster! | Iconosquare

Richard is instagramming my office….LeEtta’s copyright poster!

Source: LeEtta’s copyright poster! | Iconosquare

IFLA — Libraries, Copyright and Creativity

IFLA — Libraries, Copyright and Creativity published on No Comments on IFLA — Libraries, Copyright and Creativity

copyright-creativity

Source: IFLA — Libraries, Copyright and Creativity

Smells Like Library by Tommy Kovac

Smells Like Library by Tommy Kovac published on No Comments on Smells Like Library by Tommy Kovac

smells like library

On my last indie comics mining trip in Etsy I bought:  Smells Like Library v. 2 Funny Library Comics from the tommykovac Etsy store.   Afterwards, I carried around the awesome bookmark it came with to remind me to talk about this a little more.

If you didn’t know, librarians are a diverse and often creative group who love creative stuff about libraries (and cats, but besides the point).  Tommy Kovac makes and writes wonderful creative stuff about libraries.

Besides comics you can buy through his Etsy store and comics you can read on his site, he also has a blog that Smells Like Library.  Go and breathe in.

Fair Use Week 2016

Fair Use Week 2016 published on No Comments on Fair Use Week 2016

As a special close to the week’s activities, Kyle Courtney released “The origin of U.S. fair use,” an artistic rendering of the codification of fair use into the Copyright Act of 1976… , which readers may explore here.

Source: Fair Use Week 2015 | Harvard OSC

Watch and learn more about the Re:Create Coalition – Re:Create

Watch and learn more about the Re:Create Coalition – Re:Create published on No Comments on Watch and learn more about the Re:Create Coalition – Re:Create

Source: Watch and learn more about the Re:Create Coalition – Re:Create

Save the Date! Fair Use Week 2016: February 22-26, 2016 | Fair Use Week

Save the Date! Fair Use Week 2016: February 22-26, 2016 | Fair Use Week published on No Comments on Save the Date! Fair Use Week 2016: February 22-26, 2016 | Fair Use Week

What is Fair Use Week?Each day teachers teach, students learn, researchers advance knowledge, and consumers access copyrighted information due to copyright limitations and exceptions such as fair use or fair dealing. Fair use and fair dealing are essential limitations and exceptions to copyright, allowing the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use and fair dealing are flexible doctrines, allowing copyright to adapt to new technologies. These doctrines facilitate balance in copyright law, promoting further progress and accommodating freedom of speech and expression.While fair use and fair dealing are employed on a daily basis by all users of copyrighted material, Fair Use Week is a time to promote and discuss the opportunities presented, celebrate successful stories and explain the doctrine.While Fair Use Week 2016 will be celebrated February 22–26, we believe that every week is fair use week. Fair Use Week is simply a time to promote and discuss the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, celebrate successful stories, and explain the doctrine.

Source: Save the Date! Fair Use Week 2016: February 22-26, 2016 | Fair Use Week

Just in time for the holidays

Just in time for the holidays published on No Comments on Just in time for the holidays

Free access to my recent article:”Copyright Instruction in LIS Programs: report of a survey of standards in the U.S.A,”  written with Michael English, until January 14, 2016:  http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1S5sBMYb61gqR.

I’m reading

I’m reading published on 1 Comment on I’m reading

I’m reading an article as background research for an article that I am writing where the author is quoting me from an article I have already written. Yes.

quote

from:  Kluzek, M. (2014). A practical guide to e-journal and e-book supply – a UK perspective. Interlending & Document Supply, 42(1), 13. doi:10.1108/ILDS-09-2013-0026

Aging library video collections, copyright, and ?Betamax?

Aging library video collections, copyright, and ?Betamax? published on No Comments on Aging library video collections, copyright, and ?Betamax?

This popped up into my email this week. Seriously.

Sony announces end of production of Betamax cassettes for March next year, 40 years after its introduction and 28 years after losing format war to VHS

Source: Betamax is dead, long live VHS | Technology | The Guardian

And all I could think of was the language from the ‘Limitations on exclusive rights:  Reproduction by libraries in archives’ in US Code Title 17 (yeah, I’m quoting copyright law) that says the specific reproduction allowed to libraries for preservation and such if the “existing format in which the work is stored has become obsolete.”  ‘Obsolete’ is later defined as the circumstance where “the machine or device necessary to render perceptible a work stored in that format is no longer manufactured or is no longer reasonably available in the commercial marketplace.”

I realize the announcement was in regard to Betamax cassettes and not the players, but it makes me wonder how long a format clings to life when the regular consuming public leaves it behind, believes it to be dead.  If obsolete really boils down to commercially available, then Sony’s announcement is only a depressing assertion that the aging VHS collections of the library world, those that no one is willing or able to up-format commercially, are going to wither away.  Can’t we just move on already?   I say this, but then I have recently acquired a turntable, cassette, CD player combo, and  I know there is a growing nostalgic format movement (at least among my friends).

Reports from the professional LeEMS

Reports from the professional LeEMS published on No Comments on Reports from the professional LeEMS

LeEtta Schmidt, Copyright Librarian, University of South Florida; Kyle Courtney, Copyright Advisor, Harvard University; and Calvin Manning, Managing Editor, Taylor & Francis discussed whether it is possible to be too open in an OA environment.

Source: Is There Such a Thing as Too Open in Open Access? at the Charleston Conference | Against The Grain

St. Jerome: Patron Saint of Librarians

St. Jerome: Patron Saint of Librarians published on No Comments on St. Jerome: Patron Saint of Librarians

Today is the feast day of St. Jerome, patron saint of librarians, translators and encyclopedists.  The Preus Library article by Jane Kemp skillfully describes his life and library:

St. Jerome’s personal library was considered to be the most important private collection of the period. He was a great bibliophile, interested in collecting both pagan and Christian books. His learning was considered unequaled during the time he lived since he was an insatiable reader and had a phenomenal memory for what he learned. Finally, his scholarship broke new ground with his translations of the Bible and Biblical commentaries.

Source: Library: St. Jerome: Patron Saint of Librarians

What Jane Saw

What Jane Saw published on No Comments on What Jane Saw

A historical art exhibit, rendered in colored drawing, capturing the perspective of a famous writer.  What more could you want?  Source: What Jane Saw

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